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The cornea is a clear, transparent front covering of the eye which admits light and begins the refractive process. Light rays enter the cornea, bending to pass freely through the pupil. The iris works like a shutter in a camera, adjusting the pupil, depending on how much light is entering the eye, making the pupil larger or smaller. After passing through the pupil, the light rays pass through the eye’s natural crystalline lens. This clear, flexible structure works like the lens in a camera, shortening and lengthening its width in order to focus light rays properly. Light rays then pass through a dense, transparent gel-like substance, called the vitreous that fills the globe of the eyeball and helps the eye hold its spherical shape. They come to focus on the retina, where the retina functions much like the film in a camera. The retina is responsible for capturing all of the light rays, processing them into light impulses through millions of tiny nerve endings, and then sending these light impulses through over a million nerve fibers to the optic nerve and to our brain. A yearly eye exam is important to make sure you keep your vision and to diagnose any eye disease as soon as possible. When diagnosed in the early stages you have a greater chance of keeping more of your vision.

Refractive Errors & Eye Diseases

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The Importance of Complete Eye Exams

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What to Expect During An Eye Exam

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OCT (Optical Coherence Tomography)

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Common Refractive Errors

Some of the most common vision problems are from refractive issues that can often be corrected with glasses or contact lenses. Here is a brief overview of refractive errors.

Astigmatism: Overview

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Astigmatism: Treatment Overview

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Myopia: Overview

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Myopia: Treatment Overview

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Hyperopia: Overview

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Hyperopia: Treatment Overview

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Presbyopia: Overview

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Presbyopia: Accommodation

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Presbyopia: Treatment Overview

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The Discovery Eye Foundation
Learn the intricacies of the parts of the eye and how they work together through The Discovery Eye Foundation- a non-profit organization based in Los Angeles.