4 Simple Ways to Relieve Eye Strain at Work

Eye strain is a very common condition, and though annoying, is rarely a serious condition. However, the symptoms of eye strain, or eye fatigue may lead to other vision issues if not remedied. Itching, burning, and tired eyes are all common symptoms of eye strain.
eye strain at work
Eye strain can be easily avoided if precautions are taken at home, outside, and especially at work. Taking the proper precautions will significantly reduce your risk of developing eye strain or fatigue.

Nearly every part of your daily life involves the use of your eyes. This makes avoiding common eye strain activities difficult to do. The usual culprits behind uncomfortable eyes include reading, writing, and driving for long periods.

However, the innovative tech devices attached to us at home, work, or even walking have become the most common cause of eye strain. Staring at your laptop, smartphone, tablet, or playing video games for long periods will most certainly result in eye fatigue.

In fact, approximately 50 to 90 percent of people who work on a computer suffer from computer vision syndrome. Researchers suggest up to 10 million eye doctor visits per year are the result of computer related vision issues. Let’s focus on a few ways you can prevent eye strain at work, especially if you stare at a screen.

1. First Things First, Get an Eye Exam for a Professional Diagnosis

Your eye strain or vision issues could be the result of computer vision syndrome. However, it may be a warning sign for something more serious. This emphasizes the importance of getting an eye exam before your vision problems get out of control.

If you are experiencing discomfort, double vision, and/or a significant change in vision, an underlying medical condition could be the cause. The Mayo Clinic notes that multiple factors play a role in how often you should get an eye exam. Age and your vision all have an impact.
eye strain at work
2. Take Control of Your Computer Settings for Better Eye Health

One simple solution to eye strain issues is to adjust your work computer’s settings. This easy first step in fatigue proofing your workplace will only take you a few minutes. However, the long-term benefits are clear.

• Make your computer’s display brightness the same as your work environments.
• Make your text size and contrast easy to read, because if you’re leaning in or squinting to write or read, it’s time for a change.
• Decrease your computer’s color temperature. This will emit less blue light to fry your eyes.

You can apply these simple device adjustments to your tablet and smartphone at home as well. This will keep blue light to a minimum, which has been identified as the cause for many vision related issues, such as eye strain.

3. Take Breaks and Blink More Often to Reduce Eye Strain

Taking breaks from your tech devices, such as your work computer may seem like an obvious prevention tip. However, it is actually startling how few breaks people actually take. Frequent breaks also do wonders for your overall physical and mental health, according to Stanford University researchers.

Giving your eyes a break from the intense gaze you have locked on your computer is essential. Blinking more often will also decrease the likelihood of your eye’s becoming strained. In fact, people working on a computer blink a third less than normal.
eye strain at work
4. Make Your Work Area as Seamless as Possible for Your Eyes

Looking back and forth from your work computer and documents spread all over your desk is an eye strain problem. A very common scenario in offices everywhere, however, a simple solution exists.

By employing the help of a document stand, you can easily fight eye fatigue. Your document stand should be properly lit and aligned with your computer screen. This will keep your eyes from constantly making adjustments.

The numerous solutions you can use to prevent and/or sooth eye strain at work are easy to put into action. It simply takes a bit of discipline on your part, and you should always consult your optometrist if your eye strain continues to be a daily nuisance. Because, focusing on your eye health is an important part of your overall health and happiness.

eye strain at work - Kirkpatrick

Mark Kirkpatrick
@KirkpatricM

There Is Something In Your Eye – Now What?

It is never planned. You could be putting on makeup, gardening, or even just running errands on a windy day, but all of a sudden you have something in your eye and it hurts. What do you do?
something in your eye

Small Foreign Objects

First and foremost – DON’T RUB your eye!! This could scratch your cornea and make things much worse.

  • Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water.
  •  

  • In a well-lighted area, look in a mirror to try and find the object in your eye.
  •  

  • If you wear contacts, remove them before trying to remove the object or flushing your eye.
  •  

  • Try blinking and letting your natural tearing flush out the object.
  •  

  • If the object is on the colored part of the eye or under the upper lid you can try to flush it out gently with clean cool or lukewarm water in one of three ways:
     

    1. Completely fill an eyecup or small juice glass with water and put your open eye into the container to flush out the object. Do this standing over a sink as the water will overflow.
    2.  

    3. Use a clean eyedropper and fill with water. Be careful to not touch the tip of the eyedropper to the eye.
    4.  

    5. Turn your head so your eye is down and to the side, then hold your open eye under a faucet.

     

  • If the object is in the corner or on the white part of the eye you can try flushing the eye using one of the methods listed above or a using wet cotton swab or twisted piece of tissue to lightly touch the foreign object. Make sure to not apply pressure to the eye.
  •  

  • If it is under the lower lid you can use any of the methods above by gently pulling down on your lower lid to access the object, but be careful to not push the object further down.
  •  

  • A scratchy feeling of slight discomfort may continue for a short time after removing a small object. I discomfort continues after 24-48 hours, your eye becomes red or your vision becomes blurred, immediately seek medical attention.
  •  

  • Never use tweezers, toothpicks or other hard objects to remove an object as these could damage your eye.

Never try to remove a piece of metal, anything that has punctured your eye or an object that will not come out after flushing with water. Cover both eyes to help prevent eye movement and there is no pressure on the eyes. Have a friend drive you to eye doctor immediately.

Chemicals

Do not touch your eye, but IMMEDIATELY flush your eye with clean running water from a faucet.

  • Flush your eye for a minimum of 15 minutes holding your eye open and at an angle so the runoff water does not run into the other eye. If both eyes are affected or the chemicals are on other parts of the face or body, you need to do the flushing in a shower.
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  • If you wear contact lenses, leave them in and start flushing immediately. If they do not fall out from the flushing process you can try to remove them. Then repeat the entire flushing process.
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  • Seek medical attention immediately upon completing the flushing process, regardless of how your eyes feel.

Prevention

The best way to protect yourself from getting anything into your eyes is to protect them.

  • Never use chemicals without wearing goggles that completely surround and protect the eyes.
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  • Wear specially designed goggles when swimming.
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  • Wear goggles when participating in sports where you could get hit with any flying object like a ball or bat. Also in any sport where you could get an opponent’s elbow or hand in your eye.
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  • Wear protective eyewear when using power tools or striking tools like hammers.
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  • When you are cycling, in dusty areas or it is windy, also protect your eyes with sunglasses or other protective eyewear.

 
Susan DeRemer

Susan DeRemer, CFRE
Discovery Eye Foundation

Can You Get Sunburned Eyes?

You know to slather on lots of sunblock before going out in the sun, and to keep applying it throughout the day. What about your eyes? Do you always wear a brimmed hat and sunglasses? Even on cloudy days? Can your eyes get sunburned?

The short answer is yes, you can get sunburned eyes, and just like you skin, it could come back and haunt you in the future.
 

eyes get sunburned
photo courtesy of Sarah DeRemer

Severely sunburned eyes, known as photokeratitis, is a result of prolonged exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet rays and can cause a burning sensation and blurred vision. Realize that these damaging UV rays do not just come directly from the sun, but also from the reflection of these rays from water and sand.

Symptoms of sunburned eyes include:

  • Eye pain
  • A  gritty feeling
  • Burning sensation
  • Red eyes
  • Swollen eyes and/or lids
  • Watery eyes
  • Blurred vision
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Glare and halos around lights
  • Headaches

These symptoms are temporary and should resolve on their own within 24 to 48 hours. If the symptoms last longer, see your eye doctor immediately.

While waiting for your eyes to recover you might want to:

  • Stay indoors and wear sunglasses to help with your increased light sensitivity.
  • Keep your eyes moist with preservative-free artificial tears.
  • Use OTC pain relievers to help with the pain and follow the recommended dosage.
  • DO NOT rub your eyes.
  • If you wear contact lenses, remove them immediately and stop wearing them until your eyes have returned to normal.
  • You may find that placing a cool, damp cloth over your closed eyes is soothing.

Just like with your skin, the UV rays do have a long-term effect on your eyes.  Sunlight can cause a slow deterioration of the cells in your eyes that could lead to eye diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and cataracts. Therefore it is best to limit you exposure to both direct and reflected UV rays.

The best ways to protect your eyes include wearing sunglasses that block 100% of the UV rays and a hat.  Not all sunglasses have UV protection, so make sure the ones you select do, and wear them whenever outdoors. Even on a cloudy day as UV rays penetrate clouds. For maximum protection consider wrap-around glasses to protect you from direct and indirect sunlight.  If you are participating in sports, goggles or glasses designed for your specific sport might be the best option. And don’t forget to wear a brimmed hat. It will not only protect you from indirect sunlight, it will also protect your face from sunburn.

Susan DeRemer

Susan DeRemer, CFRE
Discovery Eye Foundation

Planning a Vacation With Vision Loss

When you think of a vacation, you think of having fun, relaxing and trying new experiences. This is not so easy if your are visually impaired, especially if it is a new vacation location. It can become stressful, scary and a big ordeal, even if you have someone who is sighted going with you. What follows are a few tips and strategies for planning a vacation with vision loss. Hopefully they will help you enjoy your trip.

Planning a Vacation With Vision Loss

Susan DeRemerSusan DeRemer, CFRE

Discovery Eye Foundation

Cataracts, Cradles & Canines: Is My Child or Dog At Risk?

Many of us associate cataracts as a condition that affects mostly the aging human population, but animals can also be at risk for developing this vision robbing affliction. Cataracts is a disease which causes the lens to become opaque. It can result in partially or severely decreased vision, but it can usually be corrected with surgery.

While we know that most cases of cataracts affect the older generation of people, what about  younger children and dogs? Are they at risk of developing this dangerous disease?

A Dog’s Genes Genetics

The most common form of cataracts found in dogs is purely genetic, it can be present at birth or present itself at any time later in life, and the same is true for humans, which is called congenital cataracts. Be sure to check your dog’s eyes regularly and look for signs of irregularities, especially a cloudiness in their pupils.

A Dog With Diabetes

The second form of cataracts common in canines is associated with diabetes. Statistics share 80% of dogs who have diabetes will develop cataracts within one year of being diagnosed with the disease. Diabetes has also been linked with obesity, which is just one more reason we should be feeding our dogs a healthy diet and exercising with them regularly.

Rare With Human Children

Thankfully, when it comes to congenital cataracts, which can be present at birth or during childhood, statistics are in the favor of the child, since only about 0.4% of infants are born with this condition or could develop it later on in life.

While it’s recommended that infants have their first comprehensive eye examination at six months of age, parents should still be on the lookout for signs of this disease. The next recommended time for an eye exam performed by a professional is before a child enters school, usually at five or six years old. During these formative years, parents should be extra vigilant in watching for signs of vision problems in their children.

For more information on eyes for the rest of your two-legged brood, check out this infographic:

cataracts

6/2/16

cataracts

Tara Heath
Health Professional
Freelance Writer

Double Vision and Cataracts

Double Vision and Cataracts

Double vision, like all sudden vision irregularities is definitely something to take seriously, especially if you’ve had no history of it in the past. Even if it’s a temporary thing, it’s still something you should talk to your eye doctor about, just in case. double vision and cataracts

Known to the medical community as diplopia, double vision is when a person sees two images of an object where there should only be one, either some of the time or all of the time. The second image can be horizontally, vertically, or diagonally placed to the original, depending upon the cause of the doubled images.

Normal vision, called single binocular vision, works by having each eye produce its own image. Your brain allows your eyes to work together, so you can focus on a single area, then reconciles the two slightly images together, giving you clear sight.

Eye muscles that don’t work as well as they should, or nerves connected to the eye not functioning properly can very well result in double vision.

There are three basic types: physiological, binocular, and monocular.

+ Physiological double vision affects images in the background – things you are not currently focusing upon. This type of double vision can even be something the patient doesn’t notice, because the brain can compensate for it. Children are the most likely to complain about this kind of double vision.

+ Binocular double vision are cases where double vision occurs in both eyes, because they are not working together as they should. If you can cover one eye to get rid of the double vision, it’s binocular double vision.

+ Monocular double vision, in which only the images from one eye is doubled sometimes produces an effect known as ghosting, where the doubled-images appear to be very close together. If you cover the unaffected eye, you’ll still experience double vision. This is often an early sign of a cataract – a cloudy part in the lens of the eye. The light coming into your eyes can be scattered by the cataract, causing double vision in that eye. According to Prevent Blindness America (PBA), cataracts are the biggest cause of blindness in the world, and the most common reason people over 40 lose their vision. In the United States alone, more than 22 million people over the age of 40 are affected by cataracts. The number is expected to grow to more than 30 million by 2020 as the population ages.

Signs of a Cataract

Cataracts begin small, and unless you just happen to get a comprehensive eye exam just as it develops, it will be unnoticeable. As it grows, your vision may blur just a little, or become somewhat cloudy. In some cases, a cataract will cause lights to flare and seem too bright to your eyes. Colors may look faded. Sometimes, they can even briefly improve your vision. Eventually, however, you’ll notice a loss of vision quality that will necessitate a visit to your eye doctor – like double vision.

No one is sure why cataracts develop, which is one reason it’s so important to get a comprehensive eye exam at least once a year, especially if you happen to be over 40 years old. Age is one of the most common risk factors for cataracts, but other risks include family history, previous eye injuries or surgeries, use of corticosteroid medication, smoking, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and ultraviolet radiation, just to name some.

Cataract Treatment

Medical science has been rapidly advancing over the past few decades, including the fields involving the eye. Where a cataract was once sure to cause blindness in one or both eyes, if caught early enough, they can be removed by surgery in a fairly simple procedure. At first, the effects of cataracts can even be temporarily corrected with new glasses or the right lighting, but eventually it will grow to the point where surgery should be seriously considered.

Today’s methods of cataract surgery are highly successful. Statistics from PBA state more than 3 million Americans go through cataract surgery every year, with 9 out of 10 having their vision fully restored afterwards.

The standard procedure is for the surgeon to remove the clouded lens in your eye and replace it with a clear plastic device called an intraocular lens (IOL). These IOLs are constantly being improved, so surgeons can insert them more easily, and they are more useful to the patient receiving them. In fact, even specialized IOLs are being developed. Some might block ultraviolet light to prevent retinal damage, while others may very well correct your vision so you no longer need glasses if you needed them before.

If you find the sight in one of your eyes is showing double images, it may be a cataract, but fortunately, the state of optical surgery is so well-developed today, you can have a cataract removed in the course of an afternoon, and have clearer vision for decades to come.

5/26/16

Laura O'Donnell thumbLaura O’Donnell
EyeCare 20/20

13 Tips for Using Eye Makeup

Makeup may be an essential part of your every day routine. Or it could be something you do for special occasions or to make a fashion statement. Regardless of the occasion, eye makeup needs to be used with care to prevent infection or vision loss.
eye makeup
Here are 13 tips for using eye makeup.

1. Wash Your Hands
You are constantly using your hands and touching everything, so bacteria are always on them. This means you can transfer these bacteria onto your makeup and in your eyes. Wash your hands before applying any makeup.

2. Never Share, Never Borrow
We were all taught to share when we were children. This is not a good idea when it comes to cosmetics. When you share your makeup you are also sharing bacteria. The main danger is passing on viral conjunctivitis, or pink eye. The bacteria exist before the symptoms are apparent.

3. Eyeliner Has Its Place
Eyeliner is to be used to line the eye outside the top of the lash line and not in the eyelid margin that runs along the surface of the eyeball. There are tiny pores in the margin that produce the essential oils required for stable tear film. If the pores become clogged, it can lead to a sty, dry eyes, irritated or infected eyes.

4. Mascara
Throw away any mascara after six months because it dries out and can flake off, getting into the eye. Depending on the ingredients in the mascara, those flakes may contain something that could scratch the cornea or become an eye irritant. Also be careful when applying mascara that the wand does not touch the eye to avoid contamination.

5. False Eyelashes
Be wary of putting too much glue on the lashes and not letting it dry a bit before placing them on the lid above your own lashes. If glue enters the eye it can cause abrasions, bacterial infections, or you could be allergic to the ingredients.

6. Storage Is Important
Don’t store makeup in warm or hot places such as your car or suitcase on a warm day. Heat destroys the preservatives that keep bacteria away. Hot temperatures are a breeding ground for bacteria. Even at home keep your cosmetics in a cool, dark place.

7. Shelf-Life
Just like most perishables that use preservatives, cosmetics need to be discarded after 3-4 months to prevent possible infection.

8. Keeping Clean
Wash your brushes and applicators thoroughly and regularly to keep them clean and avoid the buildup of bacteria and oils. This also includes eyelash curlers. Think about using disposable applicators that get used once and are then thrown out.

9. Know Your Ingredients
It is important to know what is in your eye makeup. Some mascara contains parabens which can cause an allergic reaction and a stinging sensation if it gets in your eye. Kohl eyeliners may contain lead. Pencils and shadows that are iridescent, glittery or shiny may contain ingredients that could scratch the cornea or irritate the eye. Never use glitter on your eyes as it can severely scratch your cornea.

10. Don’t Mix Uses Don’t use a lip pencil on your eyes or vice versa. The danger is bacteria, as the bacteria in your saliva in different from the bacteria in and around your eyes. The FDA warns to never use your saliva to moisten cosmetics such as eyeliner, mascara or eye shadow.

11. Irritated Eyes
If your eyes appear irritated or infected contact your eye doctor and suspend ALL use until directed by your doctor. Before you go back to wearing eye makeup, replace all of it to void spreading the bacteria, and wash all applicators thoroughly.

12. Don’t Be Moving
Never apply makeup in a moving vehicle. Even if you aren’t driving, another vehicle can rear-end you and any applicator will go in your eye, possibly cause the loss of an eye. Do not apply makeup when driving, as your eyes should be focused on the road and not a mirror.

13. Removing Eye Makeup
It is important to carefully and gently remove your eye makeup each night before bed to make sure that your cosmetics don’t work their way into your eye, build up and cause damage. Try not to use waterproof mascara as it is harder to remove and increases your chances of getting something in your eye. Avoid foaming options as they likely contain sodium lauryl sulfate which can dry out the skin around the eye. Also watch out for any ingredients that are known to clog pores or contain fragrances. Try not to use waterproof mascara as it is harder to remove.

5/19/16

Susan DeRemerSusan DeRemer, CFRE
Discovery Eye Foundation

 

AMD and a Healthy Diet: How they Relate

While there is still no concrete answer as to why some do not develop age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other’s do, significant studies have proven the importance of a healthy diet and the mitochondria.

AMD is the leading cause of vision loss for those over 60 years of age in the developing countries. For decades we have studies that show the genetics and environmental factors associated with AMD. There have been over 20 genetics modification associated with AMD but there is no single gene that “causes AMD in all cases.” The genes most highly associated with AMD are found in the complement system, an important system related to controlling the inflammation in our body. A change in the complement factor H (CFH) gene from a low risk gene to a high risk gene has been associated with 43% of those developing AMD.

However, some people who have this high risk CFH gene but never develop AMD. This leads us to believe that the genetics are not the entire answer. The other factor has to do with the environment. Smoking is the leading risk factor, along with aging, exposure to sunlight and higher body mass index (obesity). But again there are obese people that smoke and never develop AMD. So, while the environmental risk factors are important, they do not answer the entire question of “why do some people get AMD but others do not?”

Recently, researchers have recognized that a major factor in the dry form of AMD is that the retinal cells begin to die off. Therefore, they have looked at important factors that keep cells alive. The mitochondria are one of the most important elements that protect the cells in the body. These subunits or organelles, produce energy for the cells, acting like batteries for the cells. And just like the batteries in a flashlight – if the batteries are not working then the flashlight dies. The same thing happens with cells – when the mitochondria are not healthy, then the cells eventually will die. Therefore to protect ourselves, it is important to keep the mitochondria healthy. One way to do this is to eat healthy foods. Over the past 20 years, the National Eye Institute (NEI) has conducted a series of studies that have identified foods and supplements that are good for the retinal cells and also the mitochondria.

 

super greens, spinachThe National Eye Institute has recommended that people who are high-risk for developing AMD eat diets rich in green leafy vegetables, whole fruits, any type of nuts and omega 3 fatty acids. Many of these foods have anti-oxidant properties that help to “turn off” genes involved with inflammation, an important factor of retinal diseases. Salmon, mackerel and sardines have the highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids. An analysis that combined the data from 9 different studies showed that fish intake at least twice a week was associated with reduced risk of early and late AMD. Other studies show that Omega-3 fatty acids improve mitochondrial function, decreases production of reactive oxygen species (free radicals that damage cells) and leads to less fat accumulation in the body. The green leafy vegetables contain important protective macular pigments (carotenoids) called lutein and zeaxanthin that reduce the risk of AMD by 43%. High levels of lipid or fat deposits in the body (obesity) can “soak-up” the lutein and zeaxanthin so that they are not available to protect the retina.

The goal is to increase the omega-3 fatty acid and carotenoid levels to protect the eye. Below is a list of foods that are eye healthy:

Foods that have lutein or zeaxanthin:

– 6mg/d of lutein and zeaxanthin – decreased

– Lutein/zeaxanthin content – ug/100g wet weight

– Kale, cooked – 15,798

– Spinach, raw – 11,935

– Spinach, cooked – 7,053

– Lettuce, raw – 2,635

– Broccoli, cooked – 2,226

– Green peas, cooked – 1350

Source: Johnson, et al 2005 Nutr Rev 63:9

 

To help kickstart an eye healthy diet, here is a list of “eye-healthy recipes” that provide nutritional support for the mitochondria and retinal cells.

Asparagus Soup
Kale Chips
Quinoa Collard Green Wraps with Summer Vegetables
Smoked Salmon Rillettes

Sources:
Geoffrey K. Broadhead, John R. Grigg, Andrew A. Chang, and Peter McCluskey Nutrition Reviews. Dietary modification and supplementation for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration VR Vol. 73(7):448–462

Chong et al., Dietary omega-3 fatty acid and fish intake in the primary prevention of age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Arch Ophthalmol 2008;126:826–33.

5/19/16

courtesy of the
SFCulinaryAcademyLogoWEB

 

 

Myopic Degeneration

Did you ever wonder while growing up what your friends with the thick glasses meant when they said they were “nearsighted”?  What exactly does it mean to be nearsighted, and what issues related to vision arise from this?

Think of your eye as a camera, which has a segment to focus the light coming into it. In the eye, this focusing segment is made up of the cornea, the clear front part of the eye, the pupil, and the natural lens inside the eye behind the pupil. Like any camera, the eye has a film to make the images, and this is the retina. The retina is a thin tissue lining the entire inside of the eye like wallpaper.

Myopic Degeneration
Figure 1. Normal retina inside the eye, the optic nerve and the blood vessels

Another term for nearsightedness is myopia. When someone is myopic, they see well up close but cannot see far away. A myopic eye is longer than average in length from the front of the eye to the back of the eye. In a sense, light and images from far away cannot reach the back of the eye where the camera film, the retina, resides. Therefore, glasses or contact lens are needed to help focus the light on to the retina to see clearly. Some people may elect to have refractive surgery to correct near sightedness. Because the eye is longer than average, the tissues inside it, like the retina, can become abnormally thinned due to stretching. It should be noted that people with myopia have an increased risk for retinal tear or detachment of the retina which can lead to rapid loss of vision. If sudden flashing lights, new floaters, or darkening of peripheral vision are seen, an eye care professional should be expeditiously consulted for an evaluation.

Myopic Degeneration
Figure 2. Myopic degeneration

Progressive thinning of the retina resulting from elongation of the eyeball is termed myopic degeneration. Individuals with more severe nearsightedness or high myopia are at greater risk for developing myopic degeneration. When thinning and atrophy occur at the part of the retina that affects central vision (macula), vision may deteriorate gradually and may not be correctable.  You can see in the Figure 2 that there are some white and black discolorations that were not present in Figure 1. These changes exemplify myopic degeneration. Glasses or contact lenses cannot correct for myopic degeneration because there is actual damage of the retina tissue when it is stretched out. There is no reversal for the actual thinning of the retina and the damage to the retina.

Myopic degeneration
Figure 3. Myopic degeneration with choroidal neovascularization

When the retina is stretched out and the eye is elongated, sometimes abnormal blood vessels can develop just below the retina. These blood vessels, termed choroidal neovascularization, can interfere with focusing of the light or bleed and can cause sudden decreased vision. The reddish discoloration in Figure 3 exemplifies bleeding from choroidal neovascularization in myopic degeneration. Fortunately there is a treatment in the form of medications that can be injected into the eye that can stop the growth of these abnormal bleeding vessels, if they are found early before permanent damage occurs to the eye.  Therefore, early diagnosis as well as treatment of choroidal neovascularization can be helpful in limiting the degree of vision loss from these bleeding blood vessels.

Not everyone with myopia develops myopic degeneration, and there is currently no algorithm to predict its development. Self-testing one eye at a time using an Amsler grid, which looks like a graph paper, to check for any distortion of straight lines on a regular basis can be a useful tool to identify any early changes. Those with myopic degeneration should have a regular dilated eye examination with an eye care professional for early detection of any treatable changes.

Image References
1.Normal Retina. Jason Calhoun MD. ASRS Image Bank.
2.Myopic degeneration. Gerrardo Garcia Aguirre MD. ASRS Image Bank.
3.Myopic degeneration and CNVM. David Callanan MD. ASRS Image Bank.

4/6/16

Judy Kim - Myopic Degeneration

Judy E. Kim, MD
Medical College of Wisconsin
NEHEP Planning Committee Member

 
 
 
 
 
Alessa Crossan - Myopic Degeneration

Alessa Crossan, MD
Medical College of Wisconsin